What are the Differences between Series and Parallel Circuits?

In order to find out how various quantities such as current, voltage, and resistance act in circuits, it is important to find out the various differences between Series and Parallel Circuits. Moreover, based on the number and type of devices connected to each other, different types of circuits are employed. And here in this below article, we will help you just do that, by providing a detailed description of parallel circuits, and series circuits, along with their circuit diagrams, and also the list of major differences between them.

What is a Series Circuit?

If the current flow in a circuit passes through all the components involved in the said circuit, then it is called Series Circuit. And moreover, in this type of circuit, the current flow follows a single path or direction. For instance, if you consider house decorating lights, then you could observe that they are simply multiply connected in series. However, there is a big disadvantage in these types of circuits, if one piece of electrical equipment connected in the circuit fails, all other equipment also does not work.

What is a Parallel Circuit?
Contrary to the Series Circuit, this involves multiple paths embedded in a circuit, which carry current to the different electrical equipment connected to them. However, one thing you should remember, even though they are multiple different paths for current to flow, the voltage will remain constant throughout the circuit.

Difference between Series Circuit and Parallel Circuit
There are multiple differences between Series and Parallel Circuits, which we are going to talk about briefly below.

Series Circuit
Current Flow: Current Flows follow a single path.
Components Arrangement: All components are connected in series.
Voltage: Voltage differs across each resistor in the circuit.
Mathematical Representation: Vt =V1+V2+V3
Component Failure: If one component fails, all other components are rendered useless.
Parallel Circuit
Current Flow: Current Flows follow multiple paths.
Components Arrangement: All components are connected in parallel.
Voltage: The voltage remains the same.
Mathematical Representation: V1=V2=V3
Component Failure: Even if one component fails, it does not affect the working of other components in the circuit.
We have covered all about the voltage in Series and Parallel Circuits, as well as a comparison of series vs parallel circuits. Now, if you find these or other topics difficult to understand, or struggling to solve different types of questions under these chapters. Then we suggest you join the online interactive classes offered by the Tutoroot platform. So that you can access various amazing features, such as cost-effective prices, doubt clearing sessions, best study materials, and many more.